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September 2015 Assignments

Page history last edited by Jane Smith-Vaniz 5 years ago

Standards by Unit 

Dates 

Learning Objectives 

Classwork 

Homework 

9/2 

I can explain what a learning target is.  

I can use commence in 3 original sentences that do not start with the same subject as examples.

 

 

 

KEY SITES and Information for this course

Class Wiki

Class Expectations

 

What are LEARNING TARGETS?  What will that mean for me?  

Added material on learning targets and even more

 

Let us COMMENCE

  • The ceremony will commence in 15 minutes.
  • The wedding can't commence until the bride's father arrives.
  • My holidays commence at the beginning of May.
  • Sales tax will be increased commencing next month.
  • She had to get all her stuff ready before the commencement of her course.
  • The dancers began to stretch and warm up in readiness for the commencement of the dance program.
  • The game of hockey commences when the puck, a round flat rubber disc, is dropped at center ice

 

 

 

Come to class with a list of activities, subjects, fields you find INTERESTING!  Why?  You will all be engaged in a passion pursuit this year...

9/3(a/c)

9/4(b/d

 

I can identify concrete vs. abstract nouns. 

 

I can use 2 concrete, sensory examples to illustrate an abstract/idea.  

 

I can use 3 vocabulary words from  in a paragraph.

 

 

Learning Targets revisited - how they show you what you must accomplish each class.

Real discussion of Class Expectations

 

Writing Expectations:  capitalization, end punctuation, spelling of VOCAB words.

N2SSWTSW

concrete vs abstract nouns

Sensory details

17f9ca7f63118484059ca3ca000e3a2c.jpg (236×305)

Now, describe what it is your love to do or explore (soccer, geology, gaming, photography, horses, aardvarks...) in a PARAGRAPH that makes use of 3 words in 

Vocabulary for "To Build a Fire"

 

Want To Build a Fire?  Let's start the story...

 

 
9/8-9/9 

I can identify foreshadowing and create at least 2 examples.

 

I can find at least 2 passages in the text that contain foreshadowing.

 

I can copy a google file, label it correctly, and use the highlighter function correctly.

 

 

Foreshadowing - an author's hint at what is to come.

CREATE 2 examples of foreshadowing the relate to your paragraph from last class (ex:  soccer -- my cleats' lucky laces broke as I pulled them tight). 

 

Continue with To Build a Fire  practicing reading & comprehension strategies.  Even if you are going to use the audio version, 

Copy the Google TEXT file of "To Build a Fire" into your OWN google doc titled "To Build a Fire"

We are going to use COLORS of highlight to annotate our files

foreshadowing - ORANGE highlight (caution)

narrator has knowledge UNKNOWN to characters - YELLOW (enlightenment)

repetition of phrase - BLUE (just because)

Vocabulary Words  - GREEN for go!

 

You may either do this as you go, or wait until you are done reading/listening and then go back.  Both ways work.  Which works best for you?  If you don't know, try highlighting JUST where you get a sense of foreshadowing first... 

  • Where does the narration foreshadow subsequent events?  Highlight them in ORANGE on your google.doc.
  • Highlight in YELLOW each time the narrator

has knowledge unknown to the characters themselves or provides his own commentary

  • Highlight in BLUE each time you spot a repeated phrase.
  • Highlight the WHOLE sentence in which you find a vocabulary word in GREEN 

 

 

Done reading/highlighting?  THEN complete the CHALLENGE:  read the ORIGINAL version London wrote for YOUTH'S COMPANION in 1901

Make note of changes in character, plot, and events.  How do these changes highlight his theme in revised version published in 1908 (read by whole class)?

 

Using the 8 words you were assigned from "To Build a Fire"Vocabularycreate a quia/quizlet or written quiz for a classmate that is FILL-IN the blank.  You may use sentences VERY SIMILAR to the samples and include a word bank.

Extra:  do all 16 words!

9/10-11 

I can find passages that indicate an omniscient narrator.  

 

 

STAR:  take your first STAR assessment to get a baseline score of reading level.   

Go to Renaissance Learning

 

Complete your reading of "To Build a Fire" along with the highlighting.  

 

Omniscient Narrator --Third person omniscient is a point of view where the narrator knows all the thoughts, actions, and feelings of all charactersThe author may move from character to character to show how each one contributes to the plot.

A small skit will follow to illustrate why an author might want to use 3rd person omniscient (vs. limited) POV.

 

Done with the reading/highlighting?  THEN complete the CHALLENGE:  EITHER read the ORIGINAL version London wrote for YOUTH'S COMPANION in 1901

Make note of changes in character, plot, and events.  How do these changes highlight his theme in revised version published in 1908 (read by whole class)?

OR

Reread the SAME version (1908) and a better grasp of author's purpose and method.  

 

VOCAB PRACTICE QUIZZES :)

 

Complete Fill-In the Blank sentences for the OTHER 8 words (if you wrote for even numbered, write for odd and vice versa) 

Vocabulary

9/14-15 

I can find at least one book in my lexile reading range that interests me.  

 

 

 

 

LMC -- Orientation & selecting a good book and other neat activities. 

 

SSR Book Selelction, Logs, and Resources

Each quarter, you will choose an independent book and write reviews.  You will bring the book to class for SSR (silent sustained reading)

The book must be at or above your reading level.

TOOLS for finding lexile of book = AMAZON

EX:  How I Live Now, lexile 1620

or 

Book within lexile

EX:  Pigskin

 

 

 

Vocab Fill-In Blank sentences exchanged.   

 

Bring an SSR book to next class.

Read at least  20 minutes in SSR book before next class -- LOG it.

 

Note:  you will have a week to decide whether to commit to your chosen book or not. 

 

 

9/16-17

I can explain the difference between TOPIC and THEME.

 

I can identify TOPIC and work with my peers to come up with possible THEME.

 

 

Vocabulary Practice 

 

Topic vs. Theme mini-lesson

  • Topics are usually expressed in ONE WORD
  • Themes are the author's message, therefore a SENTENCE

 

SSR -- what is your book about (topic)?

 

FINISH "To Build a Fire"To Build a Fire resources

 

When everyone at the table is done with their reading and annotating (highlighting) text of "To Build a Fire" tables will share/discuss the following:

  • ID passages in the story where the narrator either has knowledge unknown to the characters themselves or where the narrator provides his own commentary.
  • How would the story change if it were 1st person point of view? 
  • How does the narrator feel about the character in the story?
  • How does the narrator feel about the dog?   
  • How does the narrator's attitude toward character show up in the foreshadowing? 

AT THE END OF THE STORY,  

  • Did the man finally gain knowledge at the end of the story?
  • How would the story have changed if the man had made the trip successfully? 

 

TOGETHER, identify possible TOPICS and THEMES* for this story

 

*NOTE:  short stories usually have ONE theme

 

 

Read a minimum of 20 minutes in your SSR book and LOG it 

 

Study for the Vocabulary Quiz on "To Build a Fire" words

 

9/18 & 9/21 

I can determine key changes made by author from original material. 

 

I can explain how the changes affect the story.  

Vocabulary QUIZ 

SSR (when you finish quiz)

 

Share Theme statements about "To Build a Fire"

then we will TEST our ideas against the changes made by London.  

HOW?  We will explore the differences between versions written (1903 & 1908).

Afterall, look how Mickey has changed over the years...

 

Annotate first page of older version (first version) of the story "To Build a Fire" -- note key differences you find between this version and the one you have already read.

 

 

Read a minimum of 20 minutes in your SSR book and LOG it.  

If you are NOT engaged with your chosen book, select another!  You have one more class before you have to commit to finishing chosen book...

 

9/22-23

I can write theme statement for "To Build a Fire."

 

I can select 3 details from the text(s)* to support my theme statement.  

 

*challenge -- I can  include details from the original version in my supports.

SSR

 

With a partner, locate at least 3 places in the story that support the theme.  You will have to include at least 2 of them in your paragraph.  

ALL 3 Supports should be written out at TOP of assignment.

Then, individually, 

Write a paragraph on the theme of "To Build a Fire"

Topic Sentence = clear statement of theme.  

Elaborate on the theme with specific details from story

Set-up for supporting quote from the text.

"Supporting Quote"(London ___).

Explain/tie quote's significance to theme

Set-up for next supporting quote from the text.

"Supporting Quote"(London ___).

Explain/tie quote's significance to theme.  

Summation - perhaps advice or observation?  

 

Submit to schoology when done (you may cut/paste document into "create" box

NOTE:  there is a challenge version of this assignment.  You may elect to do either.  

 

 

Read a minimum of 20 minutes in your SSR book and LOG it    If you do not like you book, pick another and start reading it!!!
9/24-25

I can compose a paragraph following the format.

 

 

SSR

 

Topics & Abstract Nouns:  possible themes of SSR book?

Blending+Quotations[1][1] (1).ppt

Embedding Practice

Write a paragraph on the theme of "To Build a Fire"

Topic Sentence = clear statement of theme.  

Elaborate on the theme with specific details from story

Set-up for supporting quote from the text.

"Supporting Quote"(London ___).

Explain/tie quote's significance to theme

Set-up for next supporting quote from the text.

"Supporting Quote"(London ___).

Explain/tie quote's significance to theme.  

Summation - perhaps advice or observation?  

 

Submit to schoology when done (you may cut/paste document into "create" box

NOTE:  there is a challenge version of this assignment.  You may elect to do either.  

 

 

 

Read a minimum of 20 minutes in your SSR book and LOG it.  You will have to commit to chosen book next class. 

9/28-29

I can explain why I chose my book.  

 

 

SSR -- 20 MINUTES

 

then you will write a 

LETTER OF COMMITMENT for SSR book -- the assignment is on SCHOOLOGY

 

When you have completed the letter, read "The Chaser" on Actively Learn and answer the questions.

You need to enroll in Actilvely Learn -- USE YOUR RSD6 GOOGLE ACCOUNT.

CLASS CODE IS ON YOUR SCHOOLOGY ASSIGNMENT

 

Challenge:  watch the Twilight Zone episode based on this story.  What do they change/emphasize and why?

Read a minimum of 20 minutes in your SSR book and LOG it.

 

 

9/30-10/1

I can work with others to determine the theme of "The Chaser"

I can compose a paragraph using relevant supporting details from the text.   

SSR -- 20 MINUTES

 

Read "The Chaser" on Actively Learn and answer the questions.

You need to enroll in Actilvely Learn -- USE YOUR RSD6 GOOGLE ACCOUNT.

CLASS CODE IS ON YOUR SCHOOLOGY ASSIGNMENT

There is a paragraph on theme assigned.  

 

Challenge:  watch the Twilight Zone episode based on this story.  What do they change/emphasize and why?  Write a LESS FORMAL paragraph BENEATH your formal theme paragraph on why the makers of the TV show added/shifted/emphasized/changed WHAT they did (refer to specifics).  

 
Read a minimum of 20 minutes in your SSR book and LOG it. 

 

 

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